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Are you experiencing disengaged employees? What about poor communication between teams? Lack of development opportunities? Incomplete performance reviews? If you said yes to any of these problems, you have a talent management problem. The only way to build a better team is to invest in a talent management solution. Learn how to:  Identify top performers .Set performance goals. Retain employees

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ProvisHR

ProvisHR is a solutions-focused human resources and management consulting firm specializing in creating measurable success through deliberate, creative, and effective human capital strategies.

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Working From Home Version 2.0: 5 Things to Consider

Article | August 4, 2020

When COVID-19 started making headlines and employees were working from home, the idea was that this was all temporary. In a few weeks (or months), life would return to normal and we’d all be back in the workplace. That hasn’t exactly happened. In fact, many organizations are telling employees they can stay home for the rest of the summer, year, or forever.

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HRM’s financial value from obtaining more star performers

Article | August 4, 2020

We assessed the financial value of human resource management (HRM) as a function of obtaining more star performers. Specifically, we implemented utility analysis procedures on 206 samples of individual performance (i.e. output) encompassing 824,924 workers. We found that HRM adds greater financial value by obtaining more stars. Our results also offer several specific contributions to HRM theory. First, regarding how HRM produces greater value by obtaining more stars, our evidence points to a nonlinear model of HRM’s value, where HRM generates significant yet diminishing returns by increasingly obtaining the most productive ones. Second, regarding when, our results show that diminishing returns from HRM are stronger when output differences among top stars are relatively small. Third, regarding why, our study explains that small output differences among top stars may create various costs which diminish the returns from obtaining the most productive stars. Our explanation of HRM’s nonlinear pattern contributes to the star literature by helping integrate a variety of specific explanations for stars’ curvilinear influence discussed in past research. Regarding HRM practices, we highlight the need to use utility analysis procedures that more fully consider the existence of stars. Our overall empirical finding was that HRM creates greater financial value by obtaining more stars. We also offered several theoretical contributions to HRM and the star literature. First, our results offered a nonlinear model of HRM’s value, where HRM produces significant yet diminishing returns by increasingly focusing on obtaining the most productive stars. Second, regarding when, we provided evidence that diminishing returns from HRM are stronger when output differences among top stars are relatively small. Third, regarding why, we explained that small output differences among top stars may create various costs which diminish the returns from obtaining the most productive stars. Fourth, our explanation of HRM’s nonlinear pattern also contributed to the star literature by helping integrate a number of specific explanations for stars’ curvilinear influence proposed in past research. From a practical view, we highlighted the need to use utility analysis procedures that more fully consider the presence of stars because extant procedures often significantly underestimate the value brought by obtaining more stars. By considering stars more fully, valuations of HRM are more accurate and also comparable with valuations of other business areas that recognize the reality that often few products and services contribute disproportionately to a firm’s bottom line. In closing, we hope our article will stimulate HRM research and applications that fully consider the prevalence of stars and their relative value to firms.

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How To Design An Effective Employee Onboarding Experience With An LXP

Article | August 4, 2020

Successful onboarding is the key to getting new employees off to the right start. Get it right and your investment in talent pays off. Get it wrong and you risk losing people you just hired. An LXP can enhance the onboarding experience of new employees, but you need to make sure you use it effectively. Studies show how good onboarding can make the difference between new hires staying and not. But often onboarding is simply ineffectual—no more than a box-ticking exercise. But badly handled it can make a new employee feel isolated.

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EMPLOYEE EXPERIENCE

'Many Thanks': How to Deal With Rejection During Your Job Search

Article | August 4, 2020

Someone in your network tells you about a job that would be a perfect fit for you. You meet all qualifications for the job, so you apply. You put in the time to research the company and prepare for the interview. You show up 15 minutes early, dressed for success. You shine in the first round interview and are asked to come back for a second one. You meet the President and the hiring manager, the person you would report to at the job. You pass the second round and are told you are a top candidate. You get references from highly-respected and accomplished people who support your fit for the job. And now you wait. A week goes by yet you hear nothing. Then it is Friday afternoon at 4:01pm you get an email (edited for confidentiality): Subject: Many thanks To: John R. Fugazzie Sent: Fri, Mar 14, 2014 4:01 pm "I want to thank you for being such a terrific candidate for the Director position. You have a diverse set of skills and I think your deep commitment and enthusiasm is infectious and inspiring on several fronts. Unfortunately, we are not able to offer you the position. It was a very difficult decision, but I am hopeful that there might be a way that we can work together in another capacity in the future. I'll circle back to you in a few months to see what's going on in the hopes that we can make something happen. Keep up the impressive work and I look forward to checking in soon. Warm regards, Hiring Manager I founded one of the largest job search networking and support groups in America back in January 2011 during our last recession, Neighbors-helping-Neighbors USA (www.nhnusa.org) with over 1200+ success stories in ten years since our founding, we held weekly meetings up until COVID19 hit us and we them transitioned to virtual based video conferenced meetings. We have a network well in excess of 4,500 members in our LinkedIn group, and an award winning job search portal. I found myself in the same state of rejection that I often advise our members and coach them on how to handle it. After I spent a short time in disbelief that I was not going back to work soon, I had to apply the advice I gave on an almost daily basis. I had to have the same conversation with myself regarding how to deal with being rejected, again, for a job that I strongly believe I should've landed. Here's my advice for the rejected job applicant, which I practiced myself: Accept it and move on. Put full steam into the next best opportunity you are working on. Hopefully you are working on multiple job possibilities, since today you just can't sit back and wait for one job to process at a time. This is a market where you have to be juggling multiple opportunities at once because of how challenging it is to secure any one of them. Don't get angry. You are likely to feel angry, since you're human and it's hard to not take rejection personally. However, the reason you didn't get the job was probably the result of a variety of factors and not just a fault of yours. Thank your interviewer for their time. Saying thank you might be the last thing you feel like doing, but if you see in my rejection email the door may still remain open for future work, so you never want to slam that door shut. You may even impress people by handling the rejection with class and maturity. Network the interviewer. If you did impress your interviewer he/she could possibly recommend you to someone else in their network. Connect on LinkedIn with the hiring manager and anyone else you met in the interview process to make them part of your LinkedIn network. Ask the hiring manager to give you feedback. Find out what you could have done to be a stronger candidate. In my years leading NhN, I have rarely heard of an interviewer receiving feedback, but it's still worth the try. Another NhN member, in his own words, "blew an interview," but still got a pretty nice and detailed email on how he could do better next time. If you don't ask you will never get this feedback and when you do get it, you can learn valuable information about how you can do better next time. Reach out to the references you used for the job. The five references I was able to get from key people in a short time will be very helpful even for future jobs. Stay motivated and focused. Pick up the pieces and dust yourself off, follow these tips, and keep building toward your eventual success. Abby Kohut "Absolutely Abby" a nationally known recruiter and job coach shared this advice with me when I shared my rejection with her. "If you get rejected from a job, it wasn't your job to have. I can think of countless things that I was disappointed about in my career that turned out to just be blips. Right after the rejections something even better lurked around the corner. Keep your head high and get back on the horse as fast as possible. "Also, even if you love a job and are sure you are the perfect candidate, you need to have other opportunities in the hopper. It won't sting as much if you have possibilities waiting in the wings."

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ProvisHR

ProvisHR is a solutions-focused human resources and management consulting firm specializing in creating measurable success through deliberate, creative, and effective human capital strategies.

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