EMPLOYEE INSIGHTS SURVEY 2017

| December 31, 2017

article image
The staffing shortages in Japan’s labour market today are more pronounced than those seen during the “bubble” period. As a result, it is safe to say that regardless of their industry or scale, all companies are currently trying to uncover the key to retaining talented employees and overcoming competition when recruiting new personnel. The staffing shortages also mean that the labour market is now a sellers market with jobseekers now having the advantage. With jobseekers now receiving offers from multiple companies, what conditions are required for them to settle on a particular company and accept an offer.

Spotlight

SD Worx UK & Ireland

We are Payroll, HR and Time experts with over 70 years’ experience and 65,000 customers across the globe. We provide future-focused businesses with intelligent, secure, in-the-cloud solutions and services, so your people have the tools and insight they need to succeed.

OTHER ARTICLES

5 Essential Tips for Working Remotely

Article | March 26, 2020

Some people are work-from-home champions. For them, working from home means fewer distractions, more flexibility, and greater productivity. They have the perfect home-office setup, they stick to a careful routine, and they crank out high-quality work day in and day out. But not everyone falls into this category. For some, remote work can be quite a challenge, full of countless distractions, grueling hours, and high stress.

Read More

The Employers’ Guide to an Effective Work from home Policy

Article | March 26, 2020

The modern workforce has traditionally been location specific. But with the advent of telecommuting technology, the world saw a rise in remote or virtual teams being employed. By the end of 2019, 4.7 million people in the U.S. were already working remotely. And since the pandemic hit, over 88% of businesses across the world moved to a remote mode. You are now looking at a world where working out of the office is no longer the norm, and hence a work from home policy is required. Businesses are now forgoing geographical barriers and hiring the most eligible candidates to ensure a well-rounded team. There are several benefits of working from home, but it has its own set of challenges. One of the most comprehensive ways to deal with the challenges of a virtual team is a flexible work from home policy. Given the state of affairs, chances are that you too are struggling with your employees working from home. How do you ensure that the remote workforce is not only productive, but also motivated and on the same page? The easiest way is to draft an effective work from home policy. How to Implement a Work from home Policy As an employer, your employees will likely look to you for opportunities to connect remotely, regularly, and efficiently. These opportunities need to come through your work from home policy that will help develop the company’s remote work culture. Take a look at these effective practices, policies, and guidelines within your work from home policy to ensure that the switching gears of the new age workforce don’t affect your business. Rethink Your Policies First, decide whether you even need a work from home policy. A year ago, organizations had the liberty to decide whether they wanted to offer remote work at all. But with the pandemic forcing the world to adapt, everyone is working from home now irrespective of preferences. So an effective work from home policy becomes a requirement in this situation. There are several ways to design your work from home policy. But what comes down to the essence of remote work is trust. You must be willing to extend trust to your employees and their motivation and this trust should be the foundation of your work from home policy. There is no other way to approach this situation. If there is no trust involved, the policy will only serve as a piece of paper. Your work from home policy is no different than any other policy. It should reflect how you want to present yourself or your organization. And while it may be a difficult process to transition into the remote mode, remember that it is equally difficult for your employees who have to get used to a considerable amount of new processes, guidelines, and a brand new work from home policy. Similarly, it is important to extend your work from home policy to include recruitment efforts as well. Here is a guide for digital hiring that will give you insights into remote hiring procedures and best practices and help you draft an effective work from home policy. Update Your Metrics Your work from home policy is your roadmap to remote work. In the office, you may judge an employee’s productivity based on whether they are punctual or how they interact with their colleagues. Or you might have a detailed policy about how the employee is performing. But when there are compelling reasons to work from home, most of these metrics become obsolete. Therefore, your work from home policy needs to consider what metrics are relevant. Multiple studies have corroborated that employees are more productive when working remotely. But your work from home policy still needs to define how their performance is measured. Update the metrics in your policy to evaluate their output rather than work hours or punctuality. Consider changing your priorities to cold hard results over performative productivity. Here are some examples of the metrics you can employ in your work from home policy: Call volume Leads per rep Average deal cost Submissions At the end of the day, it boils down to the relationship you share with your employees., If it’s robust, productivity will flourish even in the most trying times. Reset Your Communication Channels Communication can make or break any process even in the most regular setups but when your entire workforce needs to work from home, communication becomes all the more important. Motivating your employees becomes pertinent at this juncture. There are several ways to keep everyone on the same page effectively, but for that, you will have to rethink your channels and integrate them with your work from home policy. In-person calls and meetings are not an option anymore, so you will have to figure out what works best for your team. Are they comfortable with Zoom meetings or do they prefer Slack calls instead? Is your team active on the internal channels, and is the communication clear? How do you assign tasks? Is there a clear line of accountability? All of these questions need to be answered through your work from home policy. There are several apps and software that will help you stay on track like Slack, Xebrio, and Basecamp. These tools make life easier for virtual teams and are a bonus to an in-house one. In any case, your communication channels are an integral part of your work from home policy. You can also check out how executives from other organizations are dealing with a remote workforce. Invest in Data Security Working from home comes with challenges, and one of the key challenges for you as an employer would be your data security. If you haven’t already, consider data security to be the core of your work from home policy. As your employees will be working from home, they will be handling your data individually in several locations, some on their personal devices. This could lead to catastrophic issues if any of their devices are compromised or there is a lapse in following procedures. Data security is one of the key components of an effective work from home policy, no matter the nature of work involved. Most companies today work solely on the basis of their data. And it is extremely important to ensure that the data is safe and free from any tampering. To make sure of this, you need to take a few key measures and document them within your work from home policy. Get your employees accustomed to basic data security practices Provide them with access to VPN Equip all the devices in use with up-to-date data protection Run an audit for security and password Make it mandatory to backup all work on the organization’s server Consider switching to and encouraging your employees to use cloud services Consider using an MDM/EMM solution There are many ways to ensure data security but these should give you a fair idea of what to include in your work from home policy. Offer Equipment and Tech Support Devices and software break down often, and they will continue to do so in remote mode too. In order to help your employees work from home effectively, it is important to provide them with all sorts of support necessary and make sure the provision is a part of your work from home policy. Have a dedicated person or team, depending on the size of your company, to coordinate tech support. Let your employees know the procedure to follow in case of breakdown and have a protocol in place for any contingencies in your work from home policy. It is better to be prepared and not need it, than to be unprepared and require it. And your work from home policy is the document that helps you prepare thoroughly. Conduct Frequent Team-building in Events Your employees’ morale is at an all-time low. The pandemic has wreaked havoc with personal lives, social lives, and professional lives. On top of that, remote work tends to increase feelings of isolation and alienation within people. With no in-person interaction with their team members or colleagues, there is no sense of connectedness within your team. Your work from home policy is where you can fix that. A great way to remedy that is to include non-work related activities in your work from home policy and conduct them frequently within office hours. Team-building events or fun activities go a long way in encouraging your team to feel comfortable and rejuvenated. And now that everyone is in the comfort of their home, you can get creative with the kinds of activities you plan. Ensuring that this effort is undertaken for remote employees, it is important to add these minor details into your work from home policy. In order to get a head start on your work from home policy, you can download Human Resources Report’s work from home policy template. At the end of the day, it all boils down to trust. You need to trust your team, and they need to trust you. Only then can a team survive virtual collaboration, even with a brilliant work from home policy in place. Frequently Asked Questions How do you write a work from home policy? List the positions eligible for work from home Provide detailed description of timings, KPIs, additional instructions, etc Set up technology and support requirements Follow Deck 7’s BDA guide Why is a work from home policy important? A work from home policy offers added flexibility to the job profile and is one of the highest-rated perks among millennials. It also outlines the exact expectations from remote workers and sets the tone for further interaction. A work from home policy boosts productivity, lowers costs, and helps you leverage a global workforce. Are employees who work from home more productive? Studies have shown that working from home marks an increase in the productivity levels of the employees. This could be due to the reason that employees feel more accountable for their work. What should be included in a remote work policy? The key elements of you remote work policy should be: The purpose or objective of the WFH policy Eligibility of the employees for WFH policy Duration of WFH for employees Mandatory requirements Work timings and shifts KPIs for remote employees Security and confidentiality

Read More

Great training is key to creating a positive employee experience

Article | March 26, 2020

You’d love to have employees working for you who are the type that always want to learn new things and grow, right? Right. Engaged employees spend more of their time working to improve their performance through training and development. They are the type of workers every company wants, and they expect their employers to create a positive experience for them by matching their ambition with effective training. For firms and HR professionals trying to create a positive employee experience, it’s essential that your team of in-house trainers is ready to lead the way.

Read More

Hybrid Hiring: How Artificial Intelligence and Humans Are Creating Better Recruitment Results

Article | March 26, 2020

The accelerated integration of Artificial Intelligence into HR is poised to transform the recruitment market. Its rapid expansion has advanced a long-predicted change, as the industry responds to Covid-19 and the upheaval that almost all workforces have endured. But how can HR best embrace this swift change, ensuring that AI and human practice is synchronised, to optimise the recruitment process? David Bernard, CEO of predictive recruitment platform AssessFirst, evaluates how AI can help firms to hire, retain and develop the perfect candidate. A year ago, if you happened to encounter discourse concerning AI and recruitment, you would likely be reading one of two types of articles. The first would explain why AI will lead to widespread job losses. The second would counter that no, in fact, AI will lead to abundant recruitment and job opportunities. And then came the pandemic. It became apparent to most that social restrictions would stretch beyond weeks or even months and the perceived relationship between recruitment and AI shifted: from the forecast of opportunity for recruiters to the implementation of AI solutions. The Economist referred to the adoption of new technological solutions as “tech-celeration” in a report that collated business leaders' opinions - most of which spoke of our ten year evolutionary leap in digital adoption. For those hiring managers not able to assess candidates with traditional face-to-face thoroughness, AI has offered recruiters remarkable solutions. Rather than simply assessing degrees, scanning CVs and inviting candidates in for an interview, recruiters can use tailored, self-adapting algorithms with which to find ideal candidates. The emergence of artificial intelligence In a traditional recruitment process, a single person or team of people is responsible for identifying and evaluating the candidate's soft skills. The efficiency of this practice is dependent on the recruiter's experience but, even with the most adept recruiters, the process can be problematic. The very practice of conducting an interview, which is more complex than it is credited for, can result in the recruiter missing particular candidate skills - or misunderstanding them - due to cognitive biases. Similarity bias, confirmation bias, initial impression bias, projection, and groupthink are common occurrences when we need to make quick or pressured judgments. And there is little a recruiter can do about these biases. Since they are the result of the complexities of the subconscious, recognising when we are conceding to these biases is difficult. The probability of acknowledging them and adjusting our decisions accordingly during an interview is negligible. So what problem is this feeding? It leads to inconsistent judgments that vary from one candidate to the next. It fuels the lack of diversity in the workforce that most HR and business leaders are trying to address. However, AI allows recruiters to use data from behavioural assessments and provide candidates with a standardised assessment. A fair vehicle - driven by customisable parameters – so that employer and prospective employee benefit equally. Using AI to optimise the probability of success Although AI integration has been accelerated by the pandemic, digital adoption was already surpassing traditional recruitment processes for companies like Vodafone, Tesla, and Google. These organisations – at one time ahead of the curve - are now discovering others are following suit. At AssessFirst, we’ve found that our customers benefit most when candidate profiles are compared to top performing employees – or any employees for that matter. This ensures that desirable personality traits and skills for a particular role are found with accuracy and precision. The probability of success within a particular role, within a particular team, or working for a particular manager, is suddenly predictable. The threat of AI for human autonomy We are amid an irreversible recruitment sea-change. And some fear that AI will eventually sweep away the need for human contribution. As a CEO of a tech company, I don’t believe this to be the case. Recruiters should see AI as means to assist the process rather than replace the recruiter. Consider the prioritising of traits over degrees. This requires the computing of data from hundreds or thousands of candidates, analysed in the context of a fluid hiring process and environment. Handling huge quantities of data like this at speed, with accuracy is impossible for the human brain. But this is what AI is built to do. HR and hiring managers can then immerse themselves in the human aspects: leaving data-handling to the intricacies of machine learning. Rapport-building, mentorship, work-trials, and tasks will always require the human hand and eye. And, whilst a traditional interview is far from precise and objective, offering a role to a candidate without any human interaction is, most of the time, inconceivable and immoral. The judgment of skilled recruiters allied with data collected from AI will be required and desired indefinitely. We must also acknowledge that implementing AI gives rise to new job roles and functions. People will be required to monitor, track, and adjust algorithms and data input. And, as the scope of AI tasks increases, humans will be needed to expand and refine that input and monitoring process. AI presents recruiters with the ability to hire and manage candidates with greater efficiency than ever before. But, as John Giannandrea, Apple’s senior vice president of Machine Learning and AI strategy, has remarked: “The real safety question, if you want to call it that, is that if we give these systems biased data, they will be biased.” This clarifies a key concern for all recruiters. AI is not a panacea, but a greatly beneficial and essential tool that requires the guiding hand, and learned minds, of human skill and interaction.

Read More

Spotlight

SD Worx UK & Ireland

We are Payroll, HR and Time experts with over 70 years’ experience and 65,000 customers across the globe. We provide future-focused businesses with intelligent, secure, in-the-cloud solutions and services, so your people have the tools and insight they need to succeed.

Events