Getting Employee Engagement Right Takes More Than a Village

| April 20, 2017

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Despite increasing investments in employee engagement surveys, programs, and interventions, fewer than one third of workers around the globe are engaged, resulting in high levels of commitment and discretionary effort. In many parts of the world, and especially in some industries, the percentage is even lower. Yet, we’ve seen organizations succeed with highly engaged employees who are more productive and innovative and who deliver performance that matters.

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Equal Pay Group

Pay equity is about equal pay for the same, or equivalent, work. This is achieved through reward systems that support informed and consistent pay decisions such as a clear reward strategy, thorough compensation benchmarking and job evaluation.

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How AI technology is influencing talent trends in 2020

Article | April 23, 2020

A quote that describes the role of recruiters says, “Human resources is not just a profession. It is an extremely important thing that runs businesses.” Moreover, it is the first thing to build a strong workplace which means a powerful and profitable business. And what stands as obstacles in the way for HR professionals? Time-consuming tasks like finding a suitable application from the ocean of applicants and identifying the right fit for a particular role. Well, that is just one. To deal with tons of data is a daily routine for recruiters. Thanks to the innovative technology like artificial intelligence that has tremendous benefits for every field and HR is no exception. Learn more: HR tech startups that are leveraging AI for recruitment Table of Contents: - What is AI Individually and in the HR Field? - AI in the Hiring Process - AI in Employee Experience - AI in People Analytics - AI in Internal Recruiting - AI in Managing Multi-generational Workforce What is AI Individually and in the HR Field? What is AI technology in general? To describe it in a very simple language— it is a field of computer science that reduces human efforts by solving problems related to human intelligence by activities like learning, identifying patterns, etc. It is helping recruiters maximize the work limit and build the organization to its full capacity. Now there are lots of discussions about the good and adverse uses of artificial intelligence in human resources, let’s take a look at how it is impacting the recruitment industry. As of now, the actual use of AI is yet to come into existence and that is surely going to take some period but what we are seeing right now are considered as examples of AI subsets that include machine learning, natural language processing, deep learning, machine vision, etc. These applications are hugely influencing talent trends in 2020 as described below. AI in the Hiring Process According to statistics, each corporate job offer attracts 250 resumes. Out of which on an average 4-6 people are called out for an interview and among them only one person gets the job. Now with this data, recruiters are surely going to take at least weeks to read and evaluate every resume. All this will be going on when candidates eagerly want to hear back. This task is tedious and the study says, 52% of recruitment leaders say that identifying the right candidate from a pool of applications is the most challenging part. That’s where AI is coming to the rescue. When scanning applications using people's power alone is not enough, AI-powered technology like an Applicant Tracking System (ATS) that scan CVs. The system uses keywords and phrases to filter out the data and makes it easier and time-saving activity for HRs. Now there are arguments around this because of the judgment of applicants being categorized as either Yes or No for a job position. Many people say that the decision should be based on the quality of their experience and/or personality traits which is a different aspect of looking at the use of technology. Moving ahead, it’s an undeniable fact that AI is building a special place in the HR field and there is a lot more to be invented. Its applications are helping with sourcing, pre-selection and on-boarding parts influencing the hiring whole process. AI in Employee Experience EX stands for employee experience and means thinking about everything that an employee goes through. What HRs can do to enhance employee experience is to collaborate with employees to understand their motto and design experiences that allow them to perform their best work. According to stats provided by LinkedIn, 96% of professionals say employee experience is becoming a more important trend in 2020. This talent trend can be worked upon more by using AI. How? By using the right recruiting platform that can boost EX by availing data and predictive analytics about employees who are ready for promotion, hike in the salary, eligible for an internal job change or other benefits provided by the company. This technology is helpful to HRs in managing a large number of people effectively within a company, providing training to shape employee skills, etc. AI in People Analytics Meaningful data insights can help HR professionals at every stage to take necessary decisions. People analytics provides the exact necessary information to empower recruiters with decision making capability. It takes data points of your employees and explains how they are moving through your organization. Answers to questions like are you putting the right people in the right roles, are they growing in the organization, what is employee turnover rate, etc. can give you a broader picture to take necessary actions. And how it can be done? Using statistics, predictive reporting and advanced AI recruiting algorithms. As said above, the data provides you information about the employee turnover rate. It means you can understand why people in your organization are leaving, how is their performance, is there any way you can retain them, etc. And all this can be done after using data and data analytics skills. Knowing employee performance and their reason for leaving the organization can help you fix upstream issues that can cause an organization to bleed talent. AI in Internal Recruiting Finding one suitable candidate for an organization is not as easy as it seems. It involves job posting (free or paid), running ads, getting a bunch of resumes, shortlisting, inviting for interview rounds, and then selecting the candidate. Ahead, knowing their expectations and time they join the organization is something that can’t be overlooked. The whole process demands both i.e. time and money. This frustration can be avoided if you know decide to go for internal recruiting. And this can be effectively done using AI’s ability to deal with the data. Insights taken from this data can help you better analyze a suitable candidate to fill the role without the need for going outside of the company. LinkedIn data says, 80% of employees are ready to leave if the right opportunity came their way. If these employees can reduce employee turnover rate, cost of new hiring and then why not go for internally hiring? AI recruiting algorithms can help you giving strong insights about existing employees to know the eligible candidate with the necessary qualifications for a particular job profile. AI in Managing Multi-generational Workforce What we call generation Z (Employee with age 23 and younger) is now all set to enter the corporate world with their newest ideas and baby boomers (employee age 55-73). According to statistics, 89% of HR professionals say a multigenerational workforce makes an organization more successful. Some companies are trying to understand how teams with wide life experience and different perspectives can drive more success. With variation in priorities to choose to work in an organization, many organizations have already started attracting employees by giving more benefits and make them comfortable to share their intelligence. To gain a deeper look into what employees from different ages and experience levels may need to, AI can be useful. It tells recruiting experts which employees need training, who among them are ready for promotion, who is about to retire, what should be done to fill the skill gaps and other people-focused metrics. One thing in HR is that it will keep growing by generating and requiring more data day by day. Alongside, hiring trends are also changing because of the evolution of technology. Wise action to be taken will be understanding these hiring trends and the impact of AI on it that will help you stay competitive in and beyond 2020 and be agile in the hiring world.

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Hybrid Hiring: How Artificial Intelligence and Humans Are Creating Better Recruitment Results

Article | April 23, 2020

The accelerated integration of Artificial Intelligence into HR is poised to transform the recruitment market. Its rapid expansion has advanced a long-predicted change, as the industry responds to Covid-19 and the upheaval that almost all workforces have endured. But how can HR best embrace this swift change, ensuring that AI and human practice is synchronised, to optimise the recruitment process? David Bernard, CEO of predictive recruitment platform AssessFirst, evaluates how AI can help firms to hire, retain and develop the perfect candidate. A year ago, if you happened to encounter discourse concerning AI and recruitment, you would likely be reading one of two types of articles. The first would explain why AI will lead to widespread job losses. The second would counter that no, in fact, AI will lead to abundant recruitment and job opportunities. And then came the pandemic. It became apparent to most that social restrictions would stretch beyond weeks or even months and the perceived relationship between recruitment and AI shifted: from the forecast of opportunity for recruiters to the implementation of AI solutions. The Economist referred to the adoption of new technological solutions as “tech-celeration” in a report that collated business leaders' opinions - most of which spoke of our ten year evolutionary leap in digital adoption. For those hiring managers not able to assess candidates with traditional face-to-face thoroughness, AI has offered recruiters remarkable solutions. Rather than simply assessing degrees, scanning CVs and inviting candidates in for an interview, recruiters can use tailored, self-adapting algorithms with which to find ideal candidates. The emergence of artificial intelligence In a traditional recruitment process, a single person or team of people is responsible for identifying and evaluating the candidate's soft skills. The efficiency of this practice is dependent on the recruiter's experience but, even with the most adept recruiters, the process can be problematic. The very practice of conducting an interview, which is more complex than it is credited for, can result in the recruiter missing particular candidate skills - or misunderstanding them - due to cognitive biases. Similarity bias, confirmation bias, initial impression bias, projection, and groupthink are common occurrences when we need to make quick or pressured judgments. And there is little a recruiter can do about these biases. Since they are the result of the complexities of the subconscious, recognising when we are conceding to these biases is difficult. The probability of acknowledging them and adjusting our decisions accordingly during an interview is negligible. So what problem is this feeding? It leads to inconsistent judgments that vary from one candidate to the next. It fuels the lack of diversity in the workforce that most HR and business leaders are trying to address. However, AI allows recruiters to use data from behavioural assessments and provide candidates with a standardised assessment. A fair vehicle - driven by customisable parameters – so that employer and prospective employee benefit equally. Using AI to optimise the probability of success Although AI integration has been accelerated by the pandemic, digital adoption was already surpassing traditional recruitment processes for companies like Vodafone, Tesla, and Google. These organisations – at one time ahead of the curve - are now discovering others are following suit. At AssessFirst, we’ve found that our customers benefit most when candidate profiles are compared to top performing employees – or any employees for that matter. This ensures that desirable personality traits and skills for a particular role are found with accuracy and precision. The probability of success within a particular role, within a particular team, or working for a particular manager, is suddenly predictable. The threat of AI for human autonomy We are amid an irreversible recruitment sea-change. And some fear that AI will eventually sweep away the need for human contribution. As a CEO of a tech company, I don’t believe this to be the case. Recruiters should see AI as means to assist the process rather than replace the recruiter. Consider the prioritising of traits over degrees. This requires the computing of data from hundreds or thousands of candidates, analysed in the context of a fluid hiring process and environment. Handling huge quantities of data like this at speed, with accuracy is impossible for the human brain. But this is what AI is built to do. HR and hiring managers can then immerse themselves in the human aspects: leaving data-handling to the intricacies of machine learning. Rapport-building, mentorship, work-trials, and tasks will always require the human hand and eye. And, whilst a traditional interview is far from precise and objective, offering a role to a candidate without any human interaction is, most of the time, inconceivable and immoral. The judgment of skilled recruiters allied with data collected from AI will be required and desired indefinitely. We must also acknowledge that implementing AI gives rise to new job roles and functions. People will be required to monitor, track, and adjust algorithms and data input. And, as the scope of AI tasks increases, humans will be needed to expand and refine that input and monitoring process. AI presents recruiters with the ability to hire and manage candidates with greater efficiency than ever before. But, as John Giannandrea, Apple’s senior vice president of Machine Learning and AI strategy, has remarked: “The real safety question, if you want to call it that, is that if we give these systems biased data, they will be biased.” This clarifies a key concern for all recruiters. AI is not a panacea, but a greatly beneficial and essential tool that requires the guiding hand, and learned minds, of human skill and interaction.

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With a return to work, should you re-onboard employees who started remotely during a lockdown?

Article | April 23, 2020

Onboarding is a broad term that captures many of the critical moments when a new starter joins your company and begins when your new candidate accepts their job offer from your business. Yet despite what COVID-19 has thrown at us, one common theme remains, onboarding is the process that ensures your new starters are ready for whatever comes at them, whether they’re based at home or in the office. But if your new starter joined your business virtually, and you’re planning on moving back to the office, should you consider re-onboarding them to an extent, or was your initial onboarding enough to support them, and your business? In this article, we take a look at why you may want to consider re-onboarding your virtual starters when returning to the workplace, and how you may go around re-onboarding employees who started remotely. When the country shifted to working from home at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic in March 2020, employers were forced to switch entire elements of their business, including onboarding, to a virtual setting. But with more offices starting to see a return to work, albeit on a hybrid approach, should you consider re-onboarding the staff who began virtually over the past 18-months? Re-onboarding and welcoming your staff back into the office will play a vital part in the success of your newer team as they grow and develop in your business, while also allowing your company’s social culture to flourish. Research from Glassdoor shows that organisations with strong onboarding practices improve employee retention by 82% and productivity by more than 70%. The report highlighted that: Great employee onboarding can improve retention by 82%. Only 12% of polled employees think their onboarding was great. Most organisations only focus 1 week on onboarding. One way to look at this question is from a legal perspective. If your new joiner is coming into the office for the first time, then they’ll need to be informed of building processes, from something as simple as what the fire procedure is, to where the first-aider sits, in case they’re required to fill in an accident form. Then there are other assessments you’ll need to perform, such as a Display Screen Equipment (DSE) assessment that will identify what improvements can be made to an employee’s workstation. But then there are also the more personal elements to consider for new starters like, security protocols (Do they need to be issued an ID badge?), conference room booking procedures, office rules (For instance, foods that are banned due to allergies), and even the more mundane things like where the tea and coffee making facilities and toilets are located. Re-onboarding is not just about switching from your home routine and moving your staff back to the office; it’s also re-onboarding your company culture and the teams within it. The entire process should address, support and educate how your employees can reach out for support if they struggle to adjust to work back in the office, to covering topics such as requirements for returning to the office, how layouts and cleaning measures may have changed, and what your expectations are for how employees use common spaces. But what are some common onboarding activities that could form part of your re-onboarding process? 6 onboarding activities that should be part of the re-onboarding experience 1. The dress code: If your staff have been working from home, you may have relaxed your dress code, but with staff returning to the office and beginning to undertake face-to-face meetings with clients, you may want to reintroduce the dress code to your new staff. 2. Defining the employees’ workstation: With both new and established staff coming back to the office, part of the re-onboarding process could include defining the employees’ workspace. Do they have a COVID secure place to work? Do they have all the equipment they need? 3. Order security cards and keys: With most offices having a secure entry system, do all of the pandemic new-starters have the required keys to get access? At this stage, you may also want to review your offboarding process, have you removed/collected these from all of the staff who have left during the office closure? 4. Face-to-Face introduction to the team: Perhaps the most missed perk of being based in the office, your re-onboarding experience offers a great opportunity to introduce your new staff members not only to their team but also to the wider company, including key figures such as management and health and safety officers. 5. Organising a work tour: This re-onboarding task can extend to both your new starters, but also your existing staff. If you’ve introduced social distancing elements to the workplace, you can use the tour to explain them to all of your staff, as well as introducing locations like meeting rooms, the kitchen and other shared spaces to new staff. 6. Review all policies, such as safety and security policies: Whilst some staff have joined your company, you may have also had some staff leave during the lockdown, so as part of your general re-onboarding, have you considered reviewing all of your policies from Fire Safety to Health and Safety? Do you still have enough trained staff on-site to cover your legal duties or do you need to invest in training for your staff?

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Long-Term Remote Work: 3 Adjustments for HR to Consider

Article | April 23, 2020

The global health pandemic has reshaped where, how and when we do our work. Many employers are beginning to accept that remote work is not just a temporary work arrangement, but a long-term solution for employees whose job function can be completed outside a traditional office setting.

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Equal Pay Group

Pay equity is about equal pay for the same, or equivalent, work. This is achieved through reward systems that support informed and consistent pay decisions such as a clear reward strategy, thorough compensation benchmarking and job evaluation.

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