How the HR Department Can Have a Positive Impact on Company Culture

| January 3, 2020

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When it comes to the HR department of a company, there can be more to it than hiring and firing. Not only can HR have an impact in relating to the employees, but it can also be influential in shaping the company’s culture, as well. Taking charge of the way that you affect company culture could seem like a big task, but by implementing a few techniques, you can help to make sure that the HR department has a positive impact on the rest of the company and its overall culture.

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Recruitment Guide

Recruitment Guide is the world’s first multi-training platform for recruitment professionals, supported by LinkedIn, Facebook and Instagram. Drawing on 30 years’ experience of starting and scaling recruitment businesses all over the world, James Caan’s new Recruitment Guide is designed to maximise the performance of recruitment consultants and managers, unleashing their potential to be the best they can be.

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Our own internal teamwork has shifted solely onto Microsoft Teams – we have short, 30-minute meetings each morning (“What’s coming up / who needs help?”) and evening (“How’s today been/ how are people feeling?”) Luckily, the availability of so many collaboration tools, and the agility of both our own team and those of our clients to adopt these, has made the situation much more manageable than we could have predicted.” Andy Brown, Chief Executive Officer - ENGAGE As for organizations that lead with technology, the switch has caused no major upheaval. According to Phillipe Guiheneuc of Akio, their teams have seamlessly transitioned to teleworking as they were already equipped with the infrastructure and the experience to undertake effective remote workforce management. “As an IT company, Akio is well equipped for teleworking - some of the teams were already doing it long before the coronavirus crisis. 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Spotlight

Recruitment Guide

Recruitment Guide is the world’s first multi-training platform for recruitment professionals, supported by LinkedIn, Facebook and Instagram. Drawing on 30 years’ experience of starting and scaling recruitment businesses all over the world, James Caan’s new Recruitment Guide is designed to maximise the performance of recruitment consultants and managers, unleashing their potential to be the best they can be.

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