How to Connect to the Pulse of the Workforce

DR. SHERI FEINZIG |

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To build an engaged workforce, it is more important than ever to understand and act on employee ideas, needs and concerns. But it’s no longer enough to just encourage employees to speak up about topics that matter to them. Organizations today need to more actively solicit, analyze and engage in ongoing conversations with past, present and even future employees. In this white paper, explore how you can use talent management and social collaboration tools to build a passionate and engaged workforce.

Spotlight

Royal Recognition, Inc

Royal Recognition, Inc. inspires, rewards, and celebrates the contributions of valued employees around the world through the development of employee recognition programs. We listen & collaborate with our clients to cultivate a wide and vast culture of recognition their valued employees deserve. This allows for brand growth, employee enrichment, and ultimately increase business through employee satisfaction.

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EMPLOYEE EXPERIENCE

'Many Thanks': How to Deal With Rejection During Your Job Search

Article | December 8, 2020

Someone in your network tells you about a job that would be a perfect fit for you. You meet all qualifications for the job, so you apply. You put in the time to research the company and prepare for the interview. You show up 15 minutes early, dressed for success. You shine in the first round interview and are asked to come back for a second one. You meet the President and the hiring manager, the person you would report to at the job. You pass the second round and are told you are a top candidate. You get references from highly-respected and accomplished people who support your fit for the job. And now you wait. A week goes by yet you hear nothing. Then it is Friday afternoon at 4:01pm you get an email (edited for confidentiality): Subject: Many thanks To: John R. Fugazzie Sent: Fri, Mar 14, 2014 4:01 pm "I want to thank you for being such a terrific candidate for the Director position. You have a diverse set of skills and I think your deep commitment and enthusiasm is infectious and inspiring on several fronts. Unfortunately, we are not able to offer you the position. It was a very difficult decision, but I am hopeful that there might be a way that we can work together in another capacity in the future. I'll circle back to you in a few months to see what's going on in the hopes that we can make something happen. Keep up the impressive work and I look forward to checking in soon. Warm regards, Hiring Manager I founded one of the largest job search networking and support groups in America back in January 2011 during our last recession, Neighbors-helping-Neighbors USA (www.nhnusa.org) with over 1200+ success stories in ten years since our founding, we held weekly meetings up until COVID19 hit us and we them transitioned to virtual based video conferenced meetings. We have a network well in excess of 4,500 members in our LinkedIn group, and an award winning job search portal. I found myself in the same state of rejection that I often advise our members and coach them on how to handle it. After I spent a short time in disbelief that I was not going back to work soon, I had to apply the advice I gave on an almost daily basis. I had to have the same conversation with myself regarding how to deal with being rejected, again, for a job that I strongly believe I should've landed. Here's my advice for the rejected job applicant, which I practiced myself: Accept it and move on. Put full steam into the next best opportunity you are working on. Hopefully you are working on multiple job possibilities, since today you just can't sit back and wait for one job to process at a time. This is a market where you have to be juggling multiple opportunities at once because of how challenging it is to secure any one of them. Don't get angry. You are likely to feel angry, since you're human and it's hard to not take rejection personally. However, the reason you didn't get the job was probably the result of a variety of factors and not just a fault of yours. Thank your interviewer for their time. Saying thank you might be the last thing you feel like doing, but if you see in my rejection email the door may still remain open for future work, so you never want to slam that door shut. You may even impress people by handling the rejection with class and maturity. Network the interviewer. If you did impress your interviewer he/she could possibly recommend you to someone else in their network. Connect on LinkedIn with the hiring manager and anyone else you met in the interview process to make them part of your LinkedIn network. Ask the hiring manager to give you feedback. Find out what you could have done to be a stronger candidate. In my years leading NhN, I have rarely heard of an interviewer receiving feedback, but it's still worth the try. Another NhN member, in his own words, "blew an interview," but still got a pretty nice and detailed email on how he could do better next time. If you don't ask you will never get this feedback and when you do get it, you can learn valuable information about how you can do better next time. Reach out to the references you used for the job. The five references I was able to get from key people in a short time will be very helpful even for future jobs. Stay motivated and focused. Pick up the pieces and dust yourself off, follow these tips, and keep building toward your eventual success. Abby Kohut "Absolutely Abby" a nationally known recruiter and job coach shared this advice with me when I shared my rejection with her. "If you get rejected from a job, it wasn't your job to have. I can think of countless things that I was disappointed about in my career that turned out to just be blips. Right after the rejections something even better lurked around the corner. Keep your head high and get back on the horse as fast as possible. "Also, even if you love a job and are sure you are the perfect candidate, you need to have other opportunities in the hopper. It won't sting as much if you have possibilities waiting in the wings."

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Challenges of Selling an HR Tech Software to a C-Suite Leaders

Article | December 8, 2020

The global business environment is experiencing unprecedented change, and the sudden transition from a full-time working office to remote working has changed almost all businesses and job styles. Hence, HR should develop new capabilities if they want to remain relevant. If you are a software company selling HR Technology, it may sound like a more significant challenge. However, the idea of selling HR Tech solutions to the C-suite is not easy, but it is not very complicated also. The HR Tech software encompasses various categories, namely HR management suits, recruitment, online interview, workforce management, time & attendance management, performance management, administration benefits, core HR and much more. Once you know the needs and expectations of the C-suite (decision-maker), it's a relatively simple process. C-suite executives love numbers. Generating revenue and profits are the top priority for all leaders. Heading in the market with a new Human Resource Management Software (HRMS), the C-Level executives will be remaining the key decision-makers of your product or service. This article will help you know what it takes to convince a C-suite that an HRMS will help them with excellent ROI and improves workforce & workplace management. What C-suites are looking for from HR Tech Efficient recruitment solutions HR Tech can be applied throughout the recruitment journey of a candidate. Companies searching for industry-specific candidates can now access a large, diversified and pool of skilled talent who is a perfect fit for the position and the work culture. In addition, companies can now hire the right talent beyond their zip code. Applying artificial intelligence and data science algorithms will better picture the candidates’ skill sets and ability to work under pressure. Advanced technology can send automated/customized emails to job aspirants with information such as – interview schedule, test score, etc., reducing the turnaround time. Succession planning The need for succession planning comes into the picture due to retirement, promotion, resignation, or diversification of employees. Systems that integrate recruitment are geared towards better succession planning, which is a long-term strategic concern of the c-suite. According to a survey by Harvard business, 63% of private firms did not have an exigency plan for CEO succession, while 69% of firms with less than $50 million in annual revenues lacked a plan. Such complex situations can be handled by making short-term backup plans, such as having a suitable candidate who can take charge of matters without the CEO. He should be able to objectively evaluate the CEO’s effect and role on the organization. Remember, succession planning and talent management are closely related processes; therefore, there is a need to integrate succession planning with talent management and the hiring process. For better solutions, a comprehensive hire-to-retire, HR Tech-driven succession planning culture must be rooted within the organization to uplift employee efficiency, encourage retention, ease risk & uncertainty and ensure cost-effectivity. Predictive analysis Predictive analytics comprises several statistical, also known as data mining techniques that study the historical data and its outcomes. These actions then try to derive a formula or algorithm that best mimics these historical findings. This algorithm then uses existing data to predict future outcomes. How does HR apply predictive analysis? HR possesses a large quantity of people data, usually managed in the Human Resources Information System (HRIS). Applying predictive analytics to the data, HR can become a strategic planner that depends on data-driven and proven predictive models rather than gut feeling. Unfortunately, not all organizations are capable of designing a predictive model for HR. As per Deloitte’s People Analytics Maturity Model 2018, only 17% of businesses globally had accessible and utilized HR data. Challenges of driving HR Tech decisions Steps to attract C-suite to buy HR Tech software’s/solutions “Great salespeople are relationship builders who provide value and help their customers win.” - Jeffrey Gitomer, American Author, Professional Speaker, and Business Trainer. Verified client reference Many C-suite executives are risk-takers, but they do not want to be the early birds regarding Human Resource Management Software (HRMS). They will not adopt a product without studying about a product or knowing its track record of success. As a comparative study, it is always advisable to provide them with references of similar-sized companies or industry, with a relatively similar workforce or work culture. Ensure a long-term vision and alignment All C-suite officials are long-term visionaries. They are capable to chart an expectation plan for the company for 10 years or so. A potential HR Tech software/solution should have a roadmap that your C-suites can invest and support. As core strategic planners, they need to know how the HR Tech will help them attain their company vision supporting HR and employee benefits. Highlight features that match C-suite expectations Every C-suit executive comes from different background and mindset; therefore, their particular area may vary. For instance, some may be interested in data analytics, while others seek the finest user experience. Therefore, it is advisable to do extensive research and data analysis on what the decision-makers want from your HR Tech software or solution. Then, based on the research, one should plan a meeting that will showcase the decision-makers area of interest. The bottom-line of investment for almost all the c-suite executives will remain cost-efficiency and getting value for solutions. Create a proven growth plan C-level executives find new ways to run a successful organization with fewer resources and deliver the best service to the organization and workforce. Simultaneously, the HR team seeks the finest talent in the industry to hire and retain for a successful endeavouring. Final thoughts The need and requirements of every organization may vary. For example, having the best-in-class or all-inclusive HR Tech solution or software from daily operational excellence to showcasing some of the most effective talent acquisition tools. As an HR Tech sales executive, your role is to understand the needs and help the decision-makers buy your solution that will offer all the features they were looking for to run a successful organization. Overall, HR Tech is a booming industry with an increased budget, so software development companies are developing trending HR Tech solutions, targeting leaders and C-suite executives have several opportunities to make a lasting impact. FAQ’s Q. Are HR’s part of the C-suite? A. The C-suite executives are the CEO, CFO, CIO, and/or COO, while HR is designated D-level or director. Q. What are the things you must highlight to sell a HR Tech to a C-level executive? A. 1. Verified client reference 2. Ensure a long-term vision and alignment 3. Highlight features that match C-suite expectations 4. Create a proven growth plan { "@context": "https://schema.org", "@type": "FAQPage", "mainEntity": [{ "@type": "Question", "name": " Are HR’s part of the C-suite?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": " The C-suite executives are the CEO, CFO, CIO, and/or COO, while HR is designated D-level or director." } },{ "@type": "Question", "name": " What are the things you must highlight to sell a HR Tech to a C-level executive?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": " Verified client reference Ensure a long-term vision and alignment Highlight features that match C-suite expectations Create a proven growth plan" } }] }

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Employee Financial Wellness Programs: Miracle Drug?

Article | December 8, 2020

This seems to be a common question HR managers and company executives hear these days, especially during a global pandemic where many are struggling financially. Interest in these programs is growing. Employers are increasingly aware that employees are struggling financially and need help beyond what traditional benefits like health insurance and retirement benefits can offer. Nearly half of employees are stressed about their finances and a quarter are distracted at work as a result. It's no wonder many employees are stressed out about money. Almost half of employees don't have enough money in savings to cover 3 months of living expenses should they need it and nearly half say they have a hard time paying their expenses.

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Adopting a talent optimization strategy

Article | December 8, 2020

Business is a balancing act comprised of trade offs, often competing objectives, and strategic decision-making. As the war for talent rages and the demographics of the workforce continue to change, the candidate and employee experience have shifted from being just HR considerations to being business considerations. Therefore, today’s executives should consider aligning their talent strategies with business strategies as the means by which overall business objectives can be obtained.

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Spotlight

Royal Recognition, Inc

Royal Recognition, Inc. inspires, rewards, and celebrates the contributions of valued employees around the world through the development of employee recognition programs. We listen & collaborate with our clients to cultivate a wide and vast culture of recognition their valued employees deserve. This allows for brand growth, employee enrichment, and ultimately increase business through employee satisfaction.

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