The ultimate guide to HCM suites for high-growth enterprises

| November 20, 2019

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Human Capital Management (HCM) is dened as a set of practices for managing human resources, with the goal of achieving organizational competency for workforce acquisition, management and optimization. HCM software is an umbrella system that impacts all people processes and drives automation, eciency, and effectiveness to achieve tangible business outcomes.

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Relocation Coordinates International

For more than 30 years, Relocation Coordinates International has been providing the finest global relocation services to clients of varying sizes, industries, and relocation volume. The breadth of our coverage includes the Americas, EMEA, Asia and Pacific Rim. We partner with our clients to design programs that match talent acquisition goals while maintaining the bottom line.

OTHER ARTICLES

Lessons of the Past: Connection and Hope

Article | July 14, 2020

As an educational leader, you’re working hard to establish at-home learning and anticipate the new normal. But there are some things you don’t need to figure out on your own. Educators who worked through crises such as the Sandy Hook school shooting, Hurricane Katrina, 9/11, and the fires in Slave Lake, Alberta, all spoke of their experiences in the hope that when the next crisis occurs, educators will be better equipped to navigate it. Amid this current crisis, these lessons have particular value.

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Karpman's Drama Triangle: How We Walk Into It & How to Avoid It

Article | July 14, 2020

The 3 Roles of Karpman’s Drama Triangle This was a familiar scenario in our home when my kids were small. It was 2008, New Year’s Day. Mum and Dad were worse for wear (Uh-hum) and so to placate the kids we all went out and bought a Wii. ‘You two kids play this whilst Mum and Dad ‘rest’. An hour later I walked into the living room to find a blanket covering the TV. ‘Why has the TV got a blanket over it?’ Gabby was 8, ‘The telly was cold’. Even through my struggling state, I sensed that might not be true. Lifting up the blanket, the wonderful colours that appeared on the screen were a sight to behold. Though not quite as much as the Wii remote that was buried in the screen. Jack, ‘Do you $££$$$$$ remember I said to put the strap thing around your wrist when you played bowling?!’ I shouted at the kids. My wife heard and came to defend them ‘as they are only little’. This is the drama triangle. In this scenario, it is short-lived, typical of young families, and provides amusing stories to ponder on in the later grey-haired years. There are much more unproductive, unhealthy, and toxic drama triangles that we have all been part of. The Persecutor, The Rescuer, and the Victim Steven Karpman came up with the drama triangle in the 1960s, winning the Eric Berne Memorial Scientific Award, and the triangle is as relevant today as it was then. The Drama Triangle is about three roles; The Persecutor, The Rescuer, and the Victim. Imagine an inverted triangle with the P top left, the R top right, and the V at the bottom. To bring it to life I’ll share where we see it every day – fairy tales, films, and TV (If yours is not ‘cold’!). Little Red Riding Hood: The Big Bad Wolf was the persecutor (Villain), The Woodsman was the Rescuer (Hero), and Little Red Riding Hood was the Victim (Damsel in distress). The drama triangle can be nicely exemplified with the Snow White fairy-tale At work, we often play out the drama triangle in our heads moving around all 3 roles. The last time you missed a deadline your brain went something like, ‘you idiot, you knew you should have done that’ – Persecutor. ‘They treat you badly. It’s not your fault’ – Victim. ‘It’s ok, we can sort this’ – Rescuer. The roles also play out in real life too. You might have a boss or a customer that is a persecutor, or you might be that persecutor looking for people to blame. Each of us enters the drama triangle at our default position. For example, you might ‘always’ be the victim. A triangle begins because of a situation, like a missed deadline, and then we play one of the 3 roles, and look to others to be the other roles. Breaking Out The challenge with the drama triangle is to know that all 3 roles end up as the victims because we move around the drama triangle until we arrive at, ‘Poor me. Help!’ To break out of this well-trodden road is about firstly knowing that the drama triangle exists, and secondly by taking the step to move your role to something much more positive. A persecutor becomes a positive challenger, the rescuer a coach, and the victim problem solves taking responsibility for the part they play. Written by Darren A. Smith https://www.makingbusinessmatter.co.uk/drama-triangle/

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How HR can protect employees’ mental health during times of crisis

Article | July 14, 2020

While there is a growing awareness of mental health issues in the Hong Kong workplace, there remains much more to do. Stress and burnout have long been acknowledged as two of the most common mental ailments, but awareness of the damaging impact of the so-called ugly sisters of anxiety and depression is also gaining traction in Hong Kong workplaces. Given the dual stressors of the coronavirus outbreak and protests in Hong Kong in recent months, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may well be another disorder added to the list of common mental health concerns.The costs of poor mental health at work – both to individuals and lost revenue for the company – must not be taken lightly.

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Diversity Data and Gender Equality: How much do we really want it?

Article | July 14, 2020

We live in a world where equality, in numerous forms, continues to reside at the forefront of many people’s minds. From gender to race and everything in between, things have certainly improved, but there is still a very long way to go. Today, there are a mere six female CEOs in the UK FTSE 100, with the average male CEO earning 17% more than the average female CEO. Gender equality has been in the spotlight far longer than other protected characteristics such as race, religion, sexual orientation, disability, age and it continues to remain prominent. And here, CEO and founder of AssessFirst, the innovative artificial intelligence recruitment firm, David Bernard, asks why, if we are losing the battle for gender equality in the FTSE 100, we should expect to see diversity, equity and inclusion successes across a much wider cross section of the business community. A race to equality and diversity The business case for gender, cultural and ethnic diversity is strong, and is only getting stronger. Since 2015, McKinsey has conducted extensive research and produced compelling reports that demonstrate ironically, whilst the business case for diversity is robust, international progress is weak. The latest reports show that those pushing ahead with gender diversity are 25% more likely to financially outperform companies in the bottom quartile. What’s more, for ethnic and cultural diversity, the top quartile companies are 36% more likely to be profitable than bottom quartile companies. The UK (aside from the US) leads the way with gender equality on executive teams. But representation here only grew by 5% between 2014 and 2019. McKinsey's global data set for 2017-2019 shows a mere 1% increase. This pitiful and indeed slowing progress is a problem. We need to do better. Yes, the UK and the US lead the way with gender diversity, but there is still a long way to go, and neighboring countries need to make quick and impactful changes. And, let’s not forget, whilst gender equality is of pressing importance, businesses and leaders should ensure that other cases, such as culture and ethnicity, are considered no less important. A knock-on effect I see a lack of diversity and equality in workforces as a psychological manifestation of who we are. We, as are all humans, are programmed to find differences in our perceptions distasteful. We just do not like change - even if we adapt to it in the end - and even 'feedback' on our actions is naturally offensive to us. So, with that in mind, it is inevitable that we have ended up in a situation where we have an echo chamber of talent that isn't necessarily supported by objective performance data. The problem manifests itself everywhere; from the executive hires in the world's biggest companies to the latest bartender pulling pints at the local pub. Conventional hiring and recruitment, such as only using a CV to identify and rank talent, is part of the root cause of bias decision-making (however implicit it may be) because the initial filter sifts candidates based on their upbringing, education, experience, or even appearance. We are, thankfully, at the start of a movement of change. But this is a problem that is hundreds, or maybe even thousands, of years in the making. We need to unpick that problem with a collaborative and collective effort. Covid-19 impacted diversity, equality and inclusion progress There has been a polarization of diversity, equality and inclusion efforts, also known as DE&I, as a fallout of Covid-19, the ongoing pandemic and the ensuing lockdowns. In the spring of 2020, companies rightly turned their attention to the Covid-19 crisis. Most have continued to do so – either to stay afloat or even gain a competitive advantage – which meant DE&I became more of a focus for some whilst a matter of less significance for others. Those that deprioritized DE&I - perhaps as a short-term measure to consolidate HR and hiring resources - have weakened their position; whether that is in their ability to retain, recruit, or mobilize their workforce, or even all those stages in the talent lifecycle. Diverse talent is often most at-risk during times of challenge and hardship, as downsizing can have a disproportionate impact on roles held by those from more diverse backgrounds. And with increased home-working practices, all manner of inequalities can manifest in ways that will hit the bottom line and badly impact minorities. For example, those who are managing childcare responsibilities during periods of isolation or school closures or those who are living in shared accommodation may be frequently working against the odds in order to keep pace with their peers. Without a diverse collective of perspective catering to a diverse workforce, these problems can multiply to cripple performance from the ground up. The acceleration of DE&I The generational leap of tech-first remote working for so many companies provided an opportunity to build inclusive and agile cultures. Though we may be coming out of the ‘crisis', there remains a golden opportunity – and one that businesses should seize. Traditional management structures, reinforced by physical office environments, have been fundamentally changed forever - even if we see a hybrid home-office working pattern become the norm from this point onward. With this revolution, HR departments find themselves in a situation a pathway to achieving diversity and inclusion goals seems more realistic. Make or break: what’s next? There is no silver bullet. There is much to consider and even more to do. But, with a few simple changes, real and meaningful progress is possible. What encourages me is that with all the companies that I speak to, particularly within the UK, there is almost wholesale agreement that this is an important issue - notwithstanding the economic arguments. However, the same cannot be said for all other countries across the globe. The most common question I receive from those who recognize the criticality of this however is, "But, where do we start?" And to that, my response is always the same; "What is the data telling you? What is your workforce saying about your DE&I efforts?" We must know what the scale of the problem is before we can tackle it. Every single company is unique, and the manner of their ideal solution is unique to suit. Once the problem is identified, I recommend a few ideas that can be considered to start spinning the wheels of change: 1) Get unbiased views of candidate potential (internal and external) 2) Consult with your DE&I team, committee, or lead when publishing job descriptions 3) Implement DE&I training for your workforce 4) Offer remote working opportunities where practical and appropriate I'm proud that AssessFirst continues to help companies of all shapes and sizes with their DE&I goals through our data-led psychometric technology. We practice what we preach with our own remote workforce and using this technology as part of our own talent lifecycle management. But I recognize that fantastic technology is most effective when it is embedded as a part of a wider reaching strategy. I have hope for the future, though there is ongoing work to do, and there will be for quite some time. But as the UK economy stirs back to life within what feels like the closing chapters of ‘crisis’, we can also bring the equality gaps to a close with renewed urgency. Working in partnership with a handful of partners in the UK, we created a Diversity and Inclusion strategy guide.

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Spotlight

Relocation Coordinates International

For more than 30 years, Relocation Coordinates International has been providing the finest global relocation services to clients of varying sizes, industries, and relocation volume. The breadth of our coverage includes the Americas, EMEA, Asia and Pacific Rim. We partner with our clients to design programs that match talent acquisition goals while maintaining the bottom line.

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