Top 10 HR Trends 2018

| February 22, 2018

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The world is changing fast and drastically challenging Human Resources leaders to respond and shape the future. Discover our top 10 HR trends that impact your company and how you work in 2018.

Spotlight

TPP Recruitment

TPP Recruitment is a specialist, highly respected and well-established UK-wide consultancy. Our areas of expertise enable us to provide dedicated support to organisations across the following non-profit and public sector organisations. TPP has connected organisations and candidates across the UK since 1996, from our office in London. Our culture is based on a set of core principles which are embedded within our teams and underpin our commitment to helping ensure organisations achieve lasting impact.

OTHER ARTICLES

Employee mobility post-lockdown – what do Global Mobility managers need to be aware of?

Article | June 17, 2020

In recent weeks, many countries have begun the process of relaxing the restrictions imposed due to Covid-19. There has been an increase in business activity in many locations and a tentative opening of borders, thereby allowing people to enter countries once again. In the hope that we will not see further waves of the virus requiring countries to reimpose some of these restrictions, what should companies be thinking about when managing employee mobility during this period of tentative recovery?

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5 tips to Improve Company Culture

Article | June 17, 2020

An organization’s company culture is something that every employee looks at. People look for a positive, healthy work environment to come to work every day. Initially, an organization should understand their values and what they want their culture to be; the image they want to share of themselves to others and what they need to do in order to achieve or maintain that image. Establishing this ahead of time as well as values and company goals will set up your business for success.

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Diversity Data and Gender Equality: How much do we really want it?

Article | June 17, 2020

We live in a world where equality, in numerous forms, continues to reside at the forefront of many people’s minds. From gender to race and everything in between, things have certainly improved, but there is still a very long way to go. Today, there are a mere six female CEOs in the UK FTSE 100, with the average male CEO earning 17% more than the average female CEO. Gender equality has been in the spotlight far longer than other protected characteristics such as race, religion, sexual orientation, disability, age and it continues to remain prominent. And here, CEO and founder of AssessFirst, the innovative artificial intelligence recruitment firm, David Bernard, asks why, if we are losing the battle for gender equality in the FTSE 100, we should expect to see diversity, equity and inclusion successes across a much wider cross section of the business community. A race to equality and diversity The business case for gender, cultural and ethnic diversity is strong, and is only getting stronger. Since 2015, McKinsey has conducted extensive research and produced compelling reports that demonstrate ironically, whilst the business case for diversity is robust, international progress is weak. The latest reports show that those pushing ahead with gender diversity are 25% more likely to financially outperform companies in the bottom quartile. What’s more, for ethnic and cultural diversity, the top quartile companies are 36% more likely to be profitable than bottom quartile companies. The UK (aside from the US) leads the way with gender equality on executive teams. But representation here only grew by 5% between 2014 and 2019. McKinsey's global data set for 2017-2019 shows a mere 1% increase. This pitiful and indeed slowing progress is a problem. We need to do better. Yes, the UK and the US lead the way with gender diversity, but there is still a long way to go, and neighboring countries need to make quick and impactful changes. And, let’s not forget, whilst gender equality is of pressing importance, businesses and leaders should ensure that other cases, such as culture and ethnicity, are considered no less important. A knock-on effect I see a lack of diversity and equality in workforces as a psychological manifestation of who we are. We, as are all humans, are programmed to find differences in our perceptions distasteful. We just do not like change - even if we adapt to it in the end - and even 'feedback' on our actions is naturally offensive to us. So, with that in mind, it is inevitable that we have ended up in a situation where we have an echo chamber of talent that isn't necessarily supported by objective performance data. The problem manifests itself everywhere; from the executive hires in the world's biggest companies to the latest bartender pulling pints at the local pub. Conventional hiring and recruitment, such as only using a CV to identify and rank talent, is part of the root cause of bias decision-making (however implicit it may be) because the initial filter sifts candidates based on their upbringing, education, experience, or even appearance. We are, thankfully, at the start of a movement of change. But this is a problem that is hundreds, or maybe even thousands, of years in the making. We need to unpick that problem with a collaborative and collective effort. Covid-19 impacted diversity, equality and inclusion progress There has been a polarization of diversity, equality and inclusion efforts, also known as DE&I, as a fallout of Covid-19, the ongoing pandemic and the ensuing lockdowns. In the spring of 2020, companies rightly turned their attention to the Covid-19 crisis. Most have continued to do so – either to stay afloat or even gain a competitive advantage – which meant DE&I became more of a focus for some whilst a matter of less significance for others. Those that deprioritized DE&I - perhaps as a short-term measure to consolidate HR and hiring resources - have weakened their position; whether that is in their ability to retain, recruit, or mobilize their workforce, or even all those stages in the talent lifecycle. Diverse talent is often most at-risk during times of challenge and hardship, as downsizing can have a disproportionate impact on roles held by those from more diverse backgrounds. And with increased home-working practices, all manner of inequalities can manifest in ways that will hit the bottom line and badly impact minorities. For example, those who are managing childcare responsibilities during periods of isolation or school closures or those who are living in shared accommodation may be frequently working against the odds in order to keep pace with their peers. Without a diverse collective of perspective catering to a diverse workforce, these problems can multiply to cripple performance from the ground up. The acceleration of DE&I The generational leap of tech-first remote working for so many companies provided an opportunity to build inclusive and agile cultures. Though we may be coming out of the ‘crisis', there remains a golden opportunity – and one that businesses should seize. Traditional management structures, reinforced by physical office environments, have been fundamentally changed forever - even if we see a hybrid home-office working pattern become the norm from this point onward. With this revolution, HR departments find themselves in a situation a pathway to achieving diversity and inclusion goals seems more realistic. Make or break: what’s next? There is no silver bullet. There is much to consider and even more to do. But, with a few simple changes, real and meaningful progress is possible. What encourages me is that with all the companies that I speak to, particularly within the UK, there is almost wholesale agreement that this is an important issue - notwithstanding the economic arguments. However, the same cannot be said for all other countries across the globe. The most common question I receive from those who recognize the criticality of this however is, "But, where do we start?" And to that, my response is always the same; "What is the data telling you? What is your workforce saying about your DE&I efforts?" We must know what the scale of the problem is before we can tackle it. Every single company is unique, and the manner of their ideal solution is unique to suit. Once the problem is identified, I recommend a few ideas that can be considered to start spinning the wheels of change: 1) Get unbiased views of candidate potential (internal and external) 2) Consult with your DE&I team, committee, or lead when publishing job descriptions 3) Implement DE&I training for your workforce 4) Offer remote working opportunities where practical and appropriate I'm proud that AssessFirst continues to help companies of all shapes and sizes with their DE&I goals through our data-led psychometric technology. We practice what we preach with our own remote workforce and using this technology as part of our own talent lifecycle management. But I recognize that fantastic technology is most effective when it is embedded as a part of a wider reaching strategy. I have hope for the future, though there is ongoing work to do, and there will be for quite some time. But as the UK economy stirs back to life within what feels like the closing chapters of ‘crisis’, we can also bring the equality gaps to a close with renewed urgency. Working in partnership with a handful of partners in the UK, we created a Diversity and Inclusion strategy guide.

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How to support your staff during the covid-19 pandemic

Article | June 17, 2020

Companies all over the world are rallying around their employees as their entire workforce has been working from home due to COVID-19. Organizations that have not thought of the possibility of 100% remote working, are also finding it adjustable and running all operations smoothly in the lockdown period. They are pulling out all the stops, keeping the spirits high, spreading the waves of happiness and trying hard to maintain a light-hearted atmosphere during this time of stress. In this challenging time of adapting to changes and the prevailing circumstances, here are five proactive approaches to provide your employees support and keep them motivated throughout. Table of Contents: 1] Essential Support to On-site Staff 2] Building a Virtual Office Culture 3] Stay Healthy, Stay Fit to Stay Away from the Disease 4] Educate & Communicate 5] Anticipate Secondary Effect 1] Essential Support to On-site Staff As the governments all over the world are seen preferring lockdown to curb the impact of COVID-19, many companies are forced to shut their doors immediately for an indefinite time period. However, some vital industries are allowed to remain open.These permitted industries include production of consumable and protective goods, along with the warehouses and transportation services that need to ship them. As an employer, it is extremely important to take care of employees’ health especially those who are working on-site. Whether it is a manufacturing plant, a warehouse, or they are working in a closed office, checking with them on their health and providing necessary help is part of our ethics as HR professionals. Unlike many companies that are putting their employees first during pandemic, everyone can contribute to maintaining a healthy atmosphere among the employees. 2] Building a Virtual Office Culture Many of your employees might have pets and kids. And this is a new addition to the virtual workplace they have created. A little flexibility in the atmosphere is bringing fun to the work resulting in increased productivity. Here are some examples of how employers are embracing the change in the workplace: Vox Media is hosting a daily story time for parents with kids, courtesy of its parent- employee resource group. The CEO of the company joined via Zoom to read stories to families. LiveIntent –a marketing technology firm created groups on the communication platform #the-bark-side, #thedailybaby, #parentsofliveintent and #WFHTipsandTricks, where people are helped to stay positive and productive, said Global Marketing SVP, Kerel Cooper. The New York Times’ advertising team held a “pet parade” for everyone to show off their pets, said Sebastian Tomich, SVP and global head of advertising solutions. These efforts from employers to support employees’ new work-life balance include practical tips too. Merkle created an internal microsite that provides learning resources along with some other content- all for parents whose kids are at home. 3] Stay Healthy, Stay Fit to Stay Away from the Disease One of the advisory ways to protect people from the coronavirus is to stay healthy. What’s a better way than to arrange some health programs from your organization for your employees. This will also help you strengthen the bond between the company and the employee. You can arrange some live workout classes twice a week like Cubeiq is doing for its employees. Managers at PubMatic are organizing “exercise-from-home-hour” where they set a particular time of the day for virtual workout classes. During this employee can pay attention towards their health by going for a walk and get active. A great example of LiveIntent which created a teledoc service that offers in-home COVID-19 testing for qualifying employees who swab themselves at home. And the tests are sent overnight to a lab for results. Some other options to encourage your employees to stay healthy is arranging a 15-20 mins session of tips on keeping better mental and physical health or inviting nutritionists to provide information on what to eat and how to stay fit during these days, etc. Also, being happy means being healthy right? So you can arrange some fun activities to contribute in your employee’s health. Those happy hours or minutes can consist of things like virtual coffee meetings, music listening sessions, or some other entertaining activities like work from home photo contests, etc. Doing this will not only make the workforce happy but also increase the productivity. 4] Educate & Communicate During a time of crisis like the COVID-19, people are seeking support. Something which will give hopes and make them feel better on the improvisation of the situation. What HRs simply can do during this time is, call them and ask how are they doing. Ask them if they are okay and need any kind of help from the company side including supplies, hardware and files they need. Encourage them to ask questions if they have any. The current situation can be a time for companies where new employees are about to join. Make sure they are getting every needful help from your side and adjusting well with the new work structure. With the business situation changing so rapidly, employees value companies that cheer them up and are able to improve themselves along with the company. For something like this not to feel disconnected from the organization, make some passing moments by asking simple conversational questions that will be emotionally helpful for them. Most companies said they are increasing the cadence of their communications to employees. Their executive teams are proactively connecting, and more departmental heads are meeting to collaborate. Things like these are important to show your support towards your employees. 5] Anticipate Secondary Effect Due to the critical situation of COVID-19; schools, universities and businesses have to close immediately. Considering these aspects of an employer’s life can make a huge impact. Parents who were dependent on daycare for their children, have fallen into a dual responsibility situation. In many cases there are not immediate family members who can step in. As an employer, you can ease this situation for employees who have become sole caretakers by allowing them modified schedules, alternative shifts or some time off. Some of the businesses have to shut the doors immediately and this has become the reason for some families to face financial crisis. For such employees of your company, any amount or relief can be a godsend. In turbulent times, financial help, workplace flexibility, or any other outside assistance can dramatically change employees’ livelihood. As we overcome the critical health situation, these small supports can help everyone for a smoother transition to normal lives. Learn more: Post Coronavirus recovery practices to follow

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Spotlight

TPP Recruitment

TPP Recruitment is a specialist, highly respected and well-established UK-wide consultancy. Our areas of expertise enable us to provide dedicated support to organisations across the following non-profit and public sector organisations. TPP has connected organisations and candidates across the UK since 1996, from our office in London. Our culture is based on a set of core principles which are embedded within our teams and underpin our commitment to helping ensure organisations achieve lasting impact.

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