US vs. UK Recruitment Divide

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It’s no secret that there are cultural differences between the U.S. and our neighbors across the pond—but did you know that those differences can affect how recruiters work every day? In everything from how they prioritize work, to how they view references and social media indiscretions, to how they anticipate hiring competition, recruiters in both the United Kingdom and the United States are learning that—while some parts of the job market are similar—many hiring tactics still depend on geography. This infographic outlines some of the most interesting comparison points.

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Sodexo - Employee & Consumer Engagement

We are the UK’s leading experts in employee and consumer engagement. We bring people and businesses together, creating experiences that build connections which make a real difference to people’s lives. What does that look like? Well, we’re a plucky team of behaviour experts, marketers and creatives who are completely dedicated to giving our clients – and the people they work with – more.

OTHER ARTICLES

Listen and act: how to get employee experience management right

Article | February 11, 2020

As the science behind employee engagement evolves, it’s become clear just how much businesses can gain from a happy and involved workforce. From improved performance, to reduced attrition, increased revenue and even a better customer experience, employee engagement is at the heart of business growth. Given these benefits, it’s no surprise that the role of HR departments is moving beyond just managing people and towards managing experiences.

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What are HR Tech Buyers Researching?

Article | February 11, 2020

“HR Should be the digital transformation leader because, in reality ‘digitalization challenges’ are work culture challenges.” - Jane McConnell, Thought Leader Over a year or so, there has been massive transformation across HR technology. Today the business leaders have become significantly more digitalized to remain competitive. In addition, the pandemic has drastically changed the way companies have adapted pace to purchase and implement new technologies. The traditional way of office-based work was replaced with a virtual workforce, prioritizing efficiency and value-creation. Rapid development in fast-paced, low-cost, modernized, and automated HR Tech solutions transforms the global hiring process. This article will guide HR Tech buyers through new technologies and help you alleviate the HR process. Trending HR Tech Features Buyers Want To scale and ease the HR process, companies have started investing in technologies. As a result, many HR Tech companies have come up with easy-to-use and implement solutions to optimize your HR processes and maximize business output. Following are the trending features that businesses are looking forward to when buying an HR Tech solution for their organization. Recruitment In the past year, a lot has happened around the recruitment process. HR professionals focus on achieving higher-value objectives like keeping staff happy and engaged, improving retention, and support recruitment strategies. Recruitment professionals can use Artificial Intelligence-powered tools for applicant sourcing, assessment, and screening. Moreover, Artificial intelligence can also help improve the candidate experience. Virtual Reality (VR) technology can be a worthful tool for recruiting and training employees. Benefits & challenges As an employer, a hybrid workforce and flexible working hours come with many challenges. Allowing remote teams with flexible working hours will help companies attract suitable candidates for the role. However, to adopt an effective remote work, companies need to ensure a secured network, cloud sharing needs to be seamless, and all the necessary software must be successfully managed. Cyber-security is one of the biggest concerns’ companies face, which can be resolved with trusted solution providers. Learning & development Learning and development have become even more important than ever. With workforces such as millennials and Gen Z are craving diversity and inclusion programs from their employers. Challenges HR Tech buyers faced are creating an employee-friendly work culture, easy ways to onboard and train, and offering the right compliance training tool. HR Tech buyers are researching technologies that are easy to implement and roll out a successful HR management program. Talent & People Management The future of the workplace has changed drastically. Talent management and people management in a remote work environment has become even more challenging. Managers and HR are constantly trying to keep the staff motivated, nurturing talent, and empowering them to improve and update holistically is becoming the top priority. Companies will recognize, develop, and retain talent for better team-building with the right technology and collaborative efforts. Leadership Development Businesses need to focus on leadership development. Millennials are confident to take over the workforce soon. However, 63% of these young workforces feel their employers are not fully developing their leadership skills. Complementary leadership includes pairing leaders with balanced skill sets so that they can share responsibilities. This leadership style helps teams remain active and well-organized. Meanwhile, HR can learn how employee performance varies and create a pool of employees recruited for leadership roles. Challenges and buying process The process of buying or investing in new technology may vary between organizations. However, a basic understanding can help build and establish prospects in the pursuit of a digital transformation. Commonly faced challenges in an organization in buying HR technology may be due to the number of decision-makers involved; stakeholders may have pre-notion views, backed by their research, and set of potential solutions are often overwhelming. Following are the steps for a business to considering while buying an HR Tech:- Identifying the problem areas and prioritize Figuring out requirement areas and uncompromised and need for process development Listing down solutions and exploring all the available options, hands-on Selecting an easy to implement, adapt, and process solution Associate with a trusted solution provider Agreement and approval of funding Final Thoughts Investing in the latest HR Tech solution doesn't necessarily be overwhelming or complicated. All the digital solutions companies are expanding to meet the demands of the changing landscape. It's no longer pioneering to have the latest and innovative technology; instead, it's becoming a widely accepted norm. FAQ's Q. Who is an HR Tech buyer? A. HR Tech buyers are the top decision-makers in any organization. They need to anticipate the future of the work environment and provide solutions to build an adaptive and flexible environment for a hybrid workforce. Q. What is new in HR technology? A. Due to a hybrid work environment, employee training and development are moving to the digital realm. This shift has given rise to the development of new and innovative solutions. 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HR STRATEGY

Digital transformation and employment: the future of the workplace in the fourth industrial revolution

Article | February 11, 2020

Around the world, and throughout almost every sector, the fourth industrial revolution is ushering in a new era – an age of digital disruption and automation, in which the very essence of how humans work is being redefined. When we refer to the fourth industrial revolution, we refer to the digital transformation of processes, tasks and jobs that have traditionally been undertaken manually. At its core, the digital transformation process involves implementing specialist technologies that ‘digitalise’ operations. Digitising operations – which can include fully or partially automating them - makes them far more efficient, cost effective, and more enjoyable for human workers. The digitising process also reduces risk, streamlines processes and allows more efficient allocation of resources. Ultimately, it enables businesses to work smarter and faster and leads to more fulfilled personnel – all at a lower cost. From the chatbots used by an insurer’s customer service departments to the increasingly automated KYC checks undertaken by investment banks, industries of all shape are already on the path of digital transformation. There remains, however, considerable concern, confusion and miscaption over how this new era of automation will impact traditional jobs, skills, training and wider company culture. In recent years, reading some of the tabloid newspapers in the UK would make you believe the worst. Headlines such as “nearly nine million British jobs could be lost to AI by 2030” and, more recently, “Covid pandemic is ‘accelerating the rise of robots’ which will lead to loss of millions of hospitality jobs” would imply digital transformation will lead to a dystopian future in which humans will become redundant (a doomsday scenario referred to as the ‘jobocalypse’). In reality, many automation tools such as Robotic Process Automation (RPA), for example, simply don’t have the capacity to ‘think’ for themselves (unlike AI); their ability lies in automating repetitive, manual, mundane high-volume tasks that require a lot of processing time but little human expertise. Given RPA cannot function or be configured without human intelligence, it has not yet been a direct driver of unemployment. Rather, the technology is there to enhance human thinking, and work side-by-side with humans, not replace them. Research from McKinsey shows that 40% of workers spend at least a quarter of their work week on repetitive tasks, whilst 60% estimate they could save at least six hours a week with greater automation of their role. University of London research also shows that employees at organisations augmented by automation get a third more done with their time, freed from the ball-and-chain burden of monotonous repetition. There will still be a need for human input and decision making in processes, but RPA is able to do the heavy lifting; and for those whose job would have previously seen them manually do the heavy lifting, they in turn can be upskilled or transferred to new, more engaging roles. In the summer of 2021, the British Commons Work and Pension Committee concluded as such, when it published a comprehensive report into the fourth industrial revolution. The report stated that: “The evidence we have heard does not suggest that new technology will lead to mass displacement of workers: instead, it is likely to lead to the creation of new jobs alongside the loss of others. Automation may also result in the transformation rather than the loss of existing jobs.” Where the greatest impact of digital transformation will lie, from a human and personnel aspect, is not therefore in redundancy – but in the skills and culture change that the process of transformation involves. Contrary to a common misconception, digital transformation is not simply about implementing technology and flicking a digital switch. It is first and foremost about change within and between people, and for change to be effective, a proactive culture – that is, a mindset that positively embraces the opportunities afforded by digital transformation – is vital. Instilling a positive culture of change will therefore be one of the greatest challenges HR departments face in the coming years. Another area that human staff will feel the greatest change as a result of automation is in upskilling and reskilling. It is already becoming increasingly important for staff to be digitally savvy and native, to understand how digital transformation is transforming the workplace, and – on a practical level – to be able to operate many of the new technologies that are being implemented. Currently, there is a considerable tech skills gap in the global workforce, with companies unable to source the tech expertise they require; there will, therefore, be considerable pressure on HR departments to ensure that existing staff are sufficiently trained and equipped with the right skills for the automated age, and that recruitment is better angled towards hiring those that are technologically fluent and capable. For any programme of transformation (be it digital or otherwise), there are five key stages to successfully implementing digital transformation which HR change makers should base a programme of transformation around. Known as the ADKAR model, the five stages are: awareness; desire; knowledge; ability and reinforcement. These stages involve effectively communicating why digital transformation is necessary; having a desire to undertake transformation; knowing how a digital transformation strategy can be implemented; having the right and capable people to implement this strategy; and ongoing reinforcement through culture and investment. The time for companies to digitally transform is now – and as the previous three revolutions have demonstrated, technology doesn’t replace – but complements and optimises human processes, paving the way for a whole host of new skills and experiences to be unlocked for those involved. Through upskilling, retraining, education and culture change, HR departments will be the key drivers of transformation. Dr Zeynep Hizir, Doctor of Digital Transformation and intelligent automation (IA) implementation academic.

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Quantum Computing: Will It Actually Produce Jobs?

Article | February 11, 2020

If you’re interested in tech, you’ve likely heard about the race to develop quantum computers. These systems compute via “qubits,” which exist not only as ones and zeros (as you find in traditional processors) but also in an in-between state known as “superposition.” For tasks such as cryptography, qubits and superposition would allow a quantum computer to analyze every potential solution simultaneously, making such systems much faster than conventional computers. Microsoft, Google, IBM, and other firms are all throwing tons of resources into quantum-computing research, hoping for a breakthrough that will make them a leader in this nascent industry.

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Spotlight

Sodexo - Employee & Consumer Engagement

We are the UK’s leading experts in employee and consumer engagement. We bring people and businesses together, creating experiences that build connections which make a real difference to people’s lives. What does that look like? Well, we’re a plucky team of behaviour experts, marketers and creatives who are completely dedicated to giving our clients – and the people they work with – more.

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